How Can Men Live Longer: Age-Based Health Care Timeline

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It’s widely known that men’s life expectancies are shorter than women’s, but why? Eating healthy and exercising are important factors but not likely to be the biggest differentiators when it comes to men’s and women’s life expectancies. So why do women live to see a larger portion of their twilight years? Do women have some secret to living longer?

The answer is simple: Get checked!

It’s no secret at all… More like a tendency that women are 100% more likely than men to visit the doctor for annual exams and preventive services (menshealthmonth.org).

Simply going to a doctor regularly makes a huge difference in managing your health and preventing health concerns into life-threatening illnesses.

Some men may be of the mindset that ignorance is bliss and going to the doctor may uncover health problems they’d rather not know about. That’s just not the case. Despite less frequent doctor’s visits, more men are diagnosed with cancer than women (half of all men vs. a third of all women) (menshealthmonth.org).

This is all the more reason to start getting check-ups as soon and as regularly as you can. Especially when many forms of cancer and other serious health conditions can be prevented or detected early with regular checkups from your health care provider.

Men’s health visits and screenings guidelines by age

Throughout our lives, our health changes and evolves. Select your age range below to see a breakdown of doctor’s visits, checkups and screenings you should be booking for a long and healthy life.

Remember: Journi is here to help users schedule preventive exams, improve their diet and exercise routine and find the best medication options.

Select an age range below to learn more

Health checks for men ages 20-39

Self-exam monthly

  • Testicular: Look for lumps in their earliest stages. 
  • Skin: Scan for signs of changing moles, freckles, or early skin cancer. 
  • Oral: Check for lesions in the mouth lasting more than 2 weeks which could be cancerous.
  • Chest: Feel for abnormal lumps that could be cancerous in their earliest stages.

Check-ups every year

  • Blood pressure: Keep an eye on your blood pressure to monitor for hypertension which can have no symptoms but cause permanent damage to your body/organs. This is something that a doctor will check at any visit.
  • Rectal exam: Schedule one of these each year to screen for hemorrhoids, lower rectal problems, colon, and prostate cancer which are much easier to treat and eliminate when caught early.
  • Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs): Sexually active adults are at risk for STDs and should be screened for syphilis, chlamydia, HIV, and other STDs at least once a year (or more frequently if they have more than one partner or don’t use a condom).

Overall health every 3-10 years

  • Physical exam (every 3 years): This is when you’ll review your overall health status and discuss health-related topics and testing needs with a doctor.
  • Blood tests and urinalysis: These tests screen for various illnesses and diseases (such as cholesterol, diabetes, kidney or thyroid dysfunction) before you experience noticeable symptoms.
  • EKG (at 30 years old): An electrocardiogram screens for heart abnormalities. In addition to screening, your results at 30 will be a baseline for tracking as you get older.
  • TB skin or blood test (every 5 years): This tests for Tuberculosis (taken based on exposure or direction of your physician--some jobs require these tests more frequently).
  • Tetanus booster (every 10 years): Tetanus is a potentially deadly bacterial infection that occurs if an open wound gets exposed. Getting a booster for the vaccine every decade prevents lockjaw and other reactions from the nervous system.

Health checks for men ages 40-49

Self-exam monthly

  • Testicular: Look for lumps in their earliest stages.
  • Skin: Scan for signs of changing moles, freckles, or early skin cancer.
  • Oral: Check for lesions in the mouth lasting more than 2 weeks which could be cancerous.
  • Chest: Feel for abnormal lumps that could be cancerous in their earliest stages.

Check-ups every year

  • Blood pressure: Keep an eye on your blood pressure to monitor for hypertension which can have no symptoms but cause permanent damage to your body/organs. This is something that a doctor will check at any visit. If your doctor prescribes a blood pressure medication, a JourniRx pharmacist* can help you find the lowest cost and most effective option.
  • Rectal exam: Schedule one of these each year to screen for hemorrhoids, lower rectal problems, colon, and prostate cancer which are much easier to treat and eliminate when caught early.
  • Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs): Sexually active adults are at risk for STDs and should be screened for syphilis, chlamydia, HIV, and other STDs at least once a year (or more frequently if they have more than one partner or don’t use a condom).
  • Hemoccult: This test detects blood in your stool that could indicate polyps or colon cancer. It can even be done at home!
  • Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) blood test: PSA is produced by the prostate. This blood test checks to see if levels of this antigen rise which would indicate an abnormality such as an infection, enlargement, or cancer. Some medical associations recommend that men take a baseline PSA blood test at age 40. Men at high risk, including African Americans, should consider an annual prostate exam beginning at age 40.

Overall health every 2-10 years

  • Physical exam (every 2 years): This is when you’ll review your overall health status and discuss health-related topics and testing needs with a doctor.
  • Blood tests and urinalysis: These tests screen for various illnesses and diseases (such as cholesterol, diabetes, kidney or thyroid dysfunction) before you experience noticeable symptoms.
  • EKG (at 30 years old): An electrocardiogram screens for heart abnormalities. In addition to screening, your results at 30 will be a baseline for tracking as you get older.
  • TB skin or blood test (every 5 years): This tests for Tuberculosis (taken based on exposure or direction of your physician--some jobs require these tests more frequently).
  • Tetanus booster (every 10 years): Tetanus is a potentially deadly bacterial infection that occurs if an open wound gets exposed. Getting a booster for the vaccine every decade prevents lockjaw and other reactions from the nervous system.
  • Chest x-ray (discuss frequency with doctor): Smokers over the age of 45 should get this screening to catch and prevent lung cancer before it spreads.
  • Testosterone screening (discuss frequency with doctor): This typically starts with a questionnaire for symptoms of low testosterone such as low sex drive, erectile dysfunction, fatigue, and depression followed by a blood test confirmation.

Health checks for men who are 50+

Self-exam monthly

  • Testicular: Look for lumps in their earliest stages.
  • Skin: Scan for signs of changing moles, freckles, or early skin cancer.
  • Oral: Check for signs of cancerous lesions in the mouth.
  • Chest: Feel for abnormal lumps that could be cancerous in their earliest stages.

Check-ups + overall health every year

  • Physical exam: This is when you’ll review your overall health status and discuss health-related topics and testing needs with a doctor.
  • Blood pressure: Keep an eye on your blood pressure to monitor for hypertension which can have no symptoms but cause permanent damage to your body/organs. This is something that a doctor will check at any visit. If your doctor prescribes a blood pressure medication, a JourniRx pharmacist* can help you find the lowest cost and most effective option.
  • Rectal exam: Schedule one of these each year to screen for hemorrhoids, lower rectal problems, colon, and prostate cancer which are much easier to treat and eliminate when caught early.
  • Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs): Sexually active adults are at risk for STDs and should be screened for syphilis, chlamydia, HIV, and other STDs at least once a year (or more frequently if they have more than one partner or don’t use a condom).
  • Hemoccult: This test detects blood in your stool that could indicate polyps or colon cancer. It can even be done at home with screening tests!
  • Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) blood test: PSA is produced by the prostate. This blood test checks to see if levels of this antigen rise which would indicate an abnormality such as an infection, enlargement, or cancer.
  • Blood tests and urinalysis: These tests screen for various illnesses and diseases (such as cholesterol, diabetes, kidney or thyroid dysfunction) before you experience noticeable symptoms.
  • EKG: An electrocardiogram screens for heart abnormalities. In addition to screening, your results at 30 will be a baseline for tracking as you get older.

Every 5-10 years (or Doctor’s discretion)

  • TB Skin or blood test (every 5 years): This tests for Tuberculosis (taken based on exposure or direction of your physician—some jobs require these tests more frequently).
  • Tetanus booster (every 10 years): Tetanus is a potentially deadly bacterial infection that occurs if an open wound gets exposed. Getting a booster for the vaccine every decade prevents lockjaw and other reactions from the nervous system.
  • Chest x-ray (discuss frequency with doctor): Smokers over the age of 45 should get this screening to catch and prevent lung cancer before it spreads.
  • Testosterone screening (discuss frequency with doctor): This typically starts with a questionnaire for symptoms of low testosterone such as low sex drive, erectile dysfunction, fatigue, and depression followed by a blood test confirmation.
  • Colorectal health check (every 3-4 years): This rectal examination looks for early stages of colon cancer and polyps.
  • Bone health after 60 (discuss with doctor): After a certain age, you want to test the strength and mineral density of your bones. This can prevent fractures and disability and scans for osteoporosis.

Select an age range below to learn more

Age 20-39

Health checks for men ages 20-39

Self-exam monthly

  • Testicular: Look for lumps in their earliest stages. 
  • Skin: Scan for signs of changing moles, freckles, or early skin cancer. 
  • Oral: Check for lesions in the mouth lasting more than 2 weeks which could be cancerous.
  • Chest: Feel for abnormal lumps that could be cancerous in their earliest stages.

Check-ups every year

  • Blood pressure: Keep an eye on your blood pressure to monitor for hypertension which can have no symptoms but cause permanent damage to your body/organs. This is something that a doctor will check at any visit.
  • Rectal exam: Schedule one of these each year to screen for hemorrhoids, lower rectal problems, colon, and prostate cancer which are much easier to treat and eliminate when caught early.
  • Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs): Sexually active adults are at risk for STDs and should be screened for syphilis, chlamydia, HIV, and other STDs at least once a year (or more frequently if they have more than one partner or don’t use a condom).

Overall health every 3-10 years

  • Physical exam (every 3 years): This is when you’ll review your overall health status and discuss health-related topics and testing needs with a doctor.
  • Blood tests and urinalysis: These tests screen for various illnesses and diseases (such as cholesterol, diabetes, kidney or thyroid dysfunction) before you experience noticeable symptoms.
  • EKG (at 30 years old): An electrocardiogram screens for heart abnormalities. In addition to screening, your results at 30 will be a baseline for tracking as you get older.
  • TB skin or blood test (every 5 years): This tests for Tuberculosis (taken based on exposure or direction of your physician--some jobs require these tests more frequently).
  • Tetanus booster (every 10 years): Tetanus is a potentially deadly bacterial infection that occurs if an open wound gets exposed. Getting a booster for the vaccine every decade prevents lockjaw and other reactions from the nervous system.

Age 40-49

Health checks for men ages 40-49

Self-exam monthly

  • Testicular: Look for lumps in their earliest stages.
  • Skin: Scan for signs of changing moles, freckles, or early skin cancer.
  • Oral: Check for lesions in the mouth lasting more than 2 weeks which could be cancerous.
  • Chest: Feel for abnormal lumps that could be cancerous in their earliest stages.

Check-ups every year

  • Blood pressure: Keep an eye on your blood pressure to monitor for hypertension which can have no symptoms but cause permanent damage to your body/organs. This is something that a doctor will check at any visit. If your doctor prescribes a blood pressure medication, a JourniRx pharmacist* can help you find the lowest cost and most effective option.
  • Rectal exam: Schedule one of these each year to screen for hemorrhoids, lower rectal problems, colon, and prostate cancer which are much easier to treat and eliminate when caught early.
  • Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs): Sexually active adults are at risk for STDs and should be screened for syphilis, chlamydia, HIV, and other STDs at least once a year (or more frequently if they have more than one partner or don’t use a condom).
  • Hemoccult: This test detects blood in your stool that could indicate polyps or colon cancer. It can even be done at home!
  • Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) blood test: PSA is produced by the prostate. This blood test checks to see if levels of this antigen rise which would indicate an abnormality such as an infection, enlargement, or cancer. Some medical associations recommend that men take a baseline PSA blood test at age 40. Men at high risk, including African Americans, should consider an annual prostate exam beginning at age 40.

Overall health every 2-10 years

  • Physical exam (every 2 years): This is when you’ll review your overall health status and discuss health-related topics and testing needs with a doctor.
  • Blood tests and urinalysis: These tests screen for various illnesses and diseases (such as cholesterol, diabetes, kidney or thyroid dysfunction) before you experience noticeable symptoms.
  • EKG (at 30 years old): An electrocardiogram screens for heart abnormalities. In addition to screening, your results at 30 will be a baseline for tracking as you get older.
  • TB skin or blood test (every 5 years): This tests for Tuberculosis (taken based on exposure or direction of your physician--some jobs require these tests more frequently).
  • Tetanus booster (every 10 years): Tetanus is a potentially deadly bacterial infection that occurs if an open wound gets exposed. Getting a booster for the vaccine every decade prevents lockjaw and other reactions from the nervous system.
  • Chest x-ray (discuss frequency with doctor): Smokers over the age of 45 should get this screening to catch and prevent lung cancer before it spreads.
  • Testosterone screening (discuss frequency with doctor): This typically starts with a questionnaire for symptoms of low testosterone such as low sex drive, erectile dysfunction, fatigue, and depression followed by a blood test confirmation.

Age 50+

Health checks for men who are 50+

Self-exam monthly

  • Testicular: Look for lumps in their earliest stages.
  • Skin: Scan for signs of changing moles, freckles, or early skin cancer.
  • Oral: Check for signs of cancerous lesions in the mouth.
  • Chest: Feel for abnormal lumps that could be cancerous in their earliest stages.

Check-ups + overall health every year

  • Physical exam: This is when you’ll review your overall health status and discuss health-related topics and testing needs with a doctor.
  • Blood pressure: Keep an eye on your blood pressure to monitor for hypertension which can have no symptoms but cause permanent damage to your body/organs. This is something that a doctor will check at any visit. If your doctor prescribes a blood pressure medication, a JourniRx pharmacist* can help you find the lowest cost and most effective option.
  • Rectal exam: Schedule one of these each year to screen for hemorrhoids, lower rectal problems, colon, and prostate cancer which are much easier to treat and eliminate when caught early.
  • Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs): Sexually active adults are at risk for STDs and should be screened for syphilis, chlamydia, HIV, and other STDs at least once a year (or more frequently if they have more than one partner or don’t use a condom).
  • Hemoccult: This test detects blood in your stool that could indicate polyps or colon cancer. It can even be done at home with screening tests!
  • Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) blood test: PSA is produced by the prostate. This blood test checks to see if levels of this antigen rise which would indicate an abnormality such as an infection, enlargement, or cancer.
  • Blood tests and urinalysis: These tests screen for various illnesses and diseases (such as cholesterol, diabetes, kidney or thyroid dysfunction) before you experience noticeable symptoms.
  • EKG: An electrocardiogram screens for heart abnormalities. In addition to screening, your results at 30 will be a baseline for tracking as you get older.

Every 5-10 years (or Doctor’s discretion)

  • TB Skin or blood test (every 5 years): This tests for Tuberculosis (taken based on exposure or direction of your physician—some jobs require these tests more frequently).
  • Tetanus booster (every 10 years): Tetanus is a potentially deadly bacterial infection that occurs if an open wound gets exposed. Getting a booster for the vaccine every decade prevents lockjaw and other reactions from the nervous system.
  • Chest x-ray (discuss frequency with doctor): Smokers over the age of 45 should get this screening to catch and prevent lung cancer before it spreads.
  • Testosterone screening (discuss frequency with doctor): This typically starts with a questionnaire for symptoms of low testosterone such as low sex drive, erectile dysfunction, fatigue, and depression followed by a blood test confirmation.
  • Colorectal health check (every 3-4 years): This rectal examination looks for early stages of colon cancer and polyps.
  • Bone health after 60 (discuss with doctor): After a certain age, you want to test the strength and mineral density of your bones. This can prevent fractures and disability and scans for osteoporosis.

Staying on top of your health doesn’t have to be a hassle

 

Journi eliminates the confusing and time-consuming parts of finding providers and booking appointments. Simply put, we do the hard stuff for you! All while taking your insurance benefits into full consideration and ensuring you understand your options for in-network providers, medications and other medical concerns.

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  • You can easily connect with a Care Guide via chat, email or phone to ask quick questions, get one-time consultations or work with them to reach long-term goals.

  • Care Guides are also available to chat 24/7 to explain benefits, help you access your Employer Assistance Program (EAP) and more.

Learn more about Journi

Source: Men’s Health Network. This health timeline is provided as a reminder of preventive services for safeguarding your health and should not be taken as medical advice. Regular checkups and age-appropriate screenings can improve your health and reduce premature death and disability. You should consult your health care provider to determine if these screenings are right for you and about the benefits of earlier screenings, especially if you are a member of a high-risk group or have a family history of disease.